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How to move a DHCP database from a computer that is running Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2008

IntroDHCP1
Export the DHCP database from Windows 2003:

1.                   On the Windows 2003 DHCP server, navigate to a command prompt
2.                   Type the following Command: netsh
3.                   Type the following Command: DHCP
4.                   Type the following Command: server <\\Name or IP Address>
5.                   Type the following Command: export c:\w2k3DHCPdb all

Note You must have local administrator permissions to export the data.

Import the DHCP database

1.       Copy the exported DHCP database file to the local hard disk of the Windows Server 2008-based computer.
2.       Install the DHCP Role on the server.
3.       Stop the DHCP server service on the server.  To do this, follow these steps:

a.       Log on to the target DHCP server by using an account that is a member of the local Administrators group.
b.      Click Start, click Run, type cmd in the Open box, and then click OK.
c.       At the command prompt, type net stop DHCPserver , and then press ENTER. You       receive a “The Microsoft DHCP Server service is stopping. The Microsoft DHCP Server service was stopped successfully” message.
d.      Type exit, and then press ENTER.
4.       Delete the DHCP.mdb file under c:\windows\system32\DHCP folder.
5.       Start the DHCP server service.
6.       Right-click on the Command Prompt (cmd) and select run as administrator, to open the cmd prompt using elevated privileges.

Note You must have local administrator permissions to import the data.

7.       Type the following Command: netsh
8.       Type the following Command: DHCP
9.       Type the following Command: server <\\Name or IP Address>
10.   Type the following Command: import c:\w2k3DHCPdb
11.   Restart DHCP and verify the database has moved over properly.

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Mount a Windows Shared Folder on Linux with Samba

Installing Prerequisites

If you are running on Ubuntu or another Debian distribution, you can install the required software by simply running the following command from a terminal prompt:

sudo apt-get smbclient smbfs

Testing the Connection

Now that you have the right tools installed, it’s time to test the connection to the Windows or Samba box with the shared folder. For this we can use the smbclient command like so:

smbclient –L geekmini –U geek

In this example, geekmini is the servername and geek is the username. You’ll be prompted for the password.



You’ll notice that you can successfully see a list of shares on the remote computer. In our case, we want to “map a drive” to the shared folder named “root”.

Create the Mount Point

Any time you want to map a drive in Linux, you should create the folder first. In this case, I want to access that shared folder from /media/Video, so I’ll first need to create the folder.

sudo mkdir /media/Video

Note that I’m using sudo because I’m creating the folder in a system-wide location owned by root.

Actually Mounting the Shared Folder

You can run the following command to mount the shared folder to a local path:

mount –t cifs –o username=geek,password=thepass //geekmini/root /media/Video

Note that you’d want to use your own details in the command. At this point you should be able to access the shared folder from /media/Video

Source:
http://www.howtogeek.com/wiki/Mount_a_Windows_Shared_Folder_on_Linux_with_Samba

Installing Confluence on CentOS 6

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I am currently trying out different WIKI web based software packages for documentation for my company. This tutorial was extremely helpful and walked me through the entire process. I would recommend against using their one step installer because you do not really know where everything ends up being put. Here are the steps I took and got it up and running within a few hours.
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Spotify and Windows 8 error

Recently, I ran into an issue with Windows 8 and Spotify. Everytime I went to start playing a song on Spotify, it would play for anywhere from 30 seconds to a minute and then crash. After uninstalling Spotify multiple times, cleaning out the registry, and even running a virus scan for good measure, I came across this forum post saying that the issue was related to using Internet Sharing, which I had previously enabled to share internet connectivity with my XBox. After disabling it, Spotify worked instantly.
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